Pharmacy dictionary Letters D-F-G-H


Pharmacy dictionary Letters D-F-G-H

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D

Discounts:

Price reductions acquired as the result of negotiation with pharmacies, wholesalers, and/or pharmaceutical manufacturers.

Dispense As Written (DAW):

DAW is a information that a physician can observe on a prescription which instructs the pharmacist to distribute the exact brand prescribed. In other words, DAW is planned to prevent substitution.

Dispensing Fees:

The fee paid for prescriptions filled. Although the fee could potentially be the equal for all prescriptions, habitually the dispensing fee paid to the pharmacy is elevated for generics and thus incents the pharmacy to help generic substitutions.

Drug Groups:

A method of classifying drugs based upon the type of bodily response drugs that group create.

Examples:
  • Statins.
  • ACE inhibitors.
  • Diuretics.
  • Bronchodilators.

Drug Quantity Management (quantity limit groups):

Controls over-utilization based upon manufacturer and FDA recommendations. The limits are predefined for a typical list of targeted drugs based upon quantity prescribed and length of treatment.

Drug Utilization Review (DUR):

The purpose of DUR is to guarantee appropriate use of prescriptions and compliance with the benefit plan design.

F

Fiduciary:

A relationship of trust, confidence and responsibility. To make decisions in the best importance of another.

Formulary:

  • A list of prescription drugs accepted for coverage under a pharmacy benefit plan.
  • A main consideration in the development of a formulary is clinical appropriateness.
  • An effort is completed to offer a complete range of drugs and carefully evaluate cost effective alternatives.

Full-Disclosure:

Sharing all relevant financial and operating information. This could also be referred to as "transparency".

G

Generic:

Drugs where the patent has expired and bioequivalent versions are created by numerous manufacturers. A generic includes the same active ingredient(s) and is chemically identical in strength, concentration, dosage form, and route of administration to a name brand drug, but the cost is considerably cheaper.

Generic Substitution:

Dispensing a generic equivalent rather than a exact brand name drug.

H

Hybrid Prescription Plans:

Feature a combination of coinsurance and copayments. As an example, a plan can charge a flat copayment amount for generics, but charge a coinsurance percentage for brand name drugs.